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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
for more self-inflicted wounds, certainly not those coming from washington. >> analysts say failure to reach a deal with poison u.s. consumer spending. the fiscal cliff would trigger tax increases and government spending cuts in january, leaving far less money in the economy. the international monetary fund warrants of knock on effects for the global economy. -- warns of knock on effects for the global economy. the pressure is on in washington to agree on a plan. only then might the applause on wall street be a little more genuine. >> with the clock ticking ever more loudly in washington, let's bring in our correspondent. first off, are the prospects of an agreement as dim as we are hearing, or could there be a last-minute deal? then of course this could happen, but i think it is quite unlikely. there is an increased pessimism that a deal can be achieved in washington, d.c. from my perspective, i think washington moves too slowly. tax rates will go for all americans, and cuts will go into effect by the end of this year, and we will see no more unemployment benefits for about 2 milli
let's close tonight with some advice from one of you to washington. >> my message to all of washington for the new year is to set partisanship aside working on behalf of 100% of the voters, fix this mess you've gotten us into, bring a balanced budget to the table to grow this economy for the long term not the short term. >> there you go. for the long term, not the short term. >> there you go. i'm don lemon. happy new year to you. jooirksz . >>> hello, i'm don lemon and this is cnn's top 10 of 2012. we look at the stories that captured our attention, what we see as the biggest stories of the year around the world, in crime, money, weather and even the biggestscandals and later this hour, those stories chosen by you. anchor of state of the union, candy crowley, with the top ten political stories of 2012. >>> like finding your favorite grain of sand on the beach. impossible number of possibilities. catch phrases become boomerangs. >> if you got a business you didn't build that. >> i like being aable to find service members. >> i'm an american woman who uses contraception. let's start ther
journal" columnist and political diary editor jason riley and washington columnist kim strossel. dan, we would like to say for a longtime we live in a center right country. if you l look at the last two presidential elections, that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living in a new progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i am not sure about the country. i think what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward and not to cut spending, but to increase spending. it is explicit from historic 20% of gdp to 25% of gdp. rather than cut spending, raise taxes as necessary to support the spending. and i would say that is in fact the french model. the question is whether that model can produce enough growth to support jobs in the economy.en >> noen question, jason. taxes are going up. we know that. spending going up for sure even before the health care law kicks in. so we are moving in that direction, particularly in the entitlement state. >> right. >> not reforming it, but actually expanding it. >> what happened was the supre
goldfarb to take questions about text extenders at 8:30 eastern. "washington journal" is next. ♪ host: we will spend about two hours this morning on the "washington journal" talking about the fiscal cliff. we want to start off hearing from you on a different topic. what do you think about hillary clinton's future and her running for president in 2016? that is our question this morning on the "washington journal." you can start dialing in now, or you can contact us via social media. you can make a comment on our facebook page. you can also send us an e-mail. from "the hill" newspaper yesterday -- a new poll by abc news and "the washington post." 57% say they support a presidential bid from every clinton in 2016. -- from hillary clinton in 2016. 68% approved of her work as secretary of state. 66% hold a favorable view of clinton after her department has faced criticism over the handling of benghazi and libya. clinton also has heavy support in new york were 54% of registered voters say they would support a presidential bid by her in 2016. that is an "the hill" newspaper. we hav
'm not going to say it. >> you are in our hearts. you can tell us what's going on in washington. what's going on in washington? >> bad dynamics. >> really? >> those of us optimistic there'd be a deal. the white house has blasted boehner's offer as much as the republicans blasted the president's. people like to say, oh, they're going to posture, but behind the scenes they're working it out. they're not. >> i hear chuck todd reported yesterday behind the scenes a top aide to barack obama, willie geist. and this -- i don't -- i'm not really good at reading the tea leaves. maybe this is good, maybe this is bad. but a top obama aide yesterday told chuck todd that if the republicans -- if these republicans were in power when abraham lincoln were there, there would still be slavery. does that help the process move along? or does it hurt? i don't really know -- >> reading between the lines. >> i know one direction, i know boy bands. >> reading between the lines, that's probably a bad omen. we do have four weeks, though. >> that's bad. >> absolutely. we have, i believe, we have 27 negotiating days. un
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relief with just two pills. ♪ >> well, washington may have made a big left turn this year, but in states across the country, another kind of reform is in the air. we begin in michigan which this month became the nation's 24th right to work state. we're back with jason riley and kim strassel and wall street journal senior economics writer steve moore also joins the panel. so, steve, this is really an interesting story that i don't think gets enough attention. >> i agree. >> paul: the reforms taking place across the country in a lot of states. who are the stars you're looking at? >> i entirely agreement with your premise, paul. if you look at, talk about the demise of the republicans on the national levels we're not seeing that on the state level. there are 30 republican governors today in america, the republicans actually picked up a governorship in north carolina so that south now is almost entirely republican, whereas just 25 years ago, it was pretty entirely democratic. and it's not just the south. states like-- >> what are they doing with that power, that's the interesting thing. >> s
keeps coming to mind as i try to follow the melodrama in washington that has us heading for a cliff. a fiscal cliff. but are we? or is this, another myth in the making? for some insight, we turn to two seasoned observers both of whose books you'll want to as santa to leave in your stocking. bruce bartlett was an economic adviser to the supply-side icon jack kemp, and to two presidents -- ronald reagan and the first george bush. he got into hot water with his conservative cohorts when he wrote a widely quoted book critical of the second president bush. his most recent work is "the benefit and the burden: tax reform-why we need it and what it will take." yves smith is the founder and editor of the popular blog naked capitalism. after 25 years in the financial services industry, she now heads the management consulting firm aurora advisors. she's the author of this book: "econned: how unenlightened self interest undermined democracy and corrupted capitalism." welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> is the fiscal cliff just a metaphor? or is it for real? >> well, the cliff is
is happening in washington. what the feds know that perhaps we don't know. >> we are getting smacked around by these two separate events. the fiscal cliff as well as aftermath of what went on with the fed. i think the fed is still very important here. take a look the dow industrials. remember, we started moving down right after we saw mr. bernanke give his press conference. we talked about fiscal cliff having problems, not having the tools to deal with the fiscal cliff. the fed not having it, should we go over that. there we are dealing with the aftermath. remember something folks, september 14 is the high for the s&p this year. you know why that is important in september 13 is the fed meeting. they bought into the fed meeting and sold right after that, sue. and they are doing that again today. we are repeating what happened just a few months ago. i think that's why it is very important. elsewhere, defense stocks. here is a group that's very worried about frustration when mr. bernanke started getting tampered with questions on the fiscal cliff. you saw the defense stocks move down. very rar
. i think we have agreed that as the distinguished alumnus of harvard said washington as a town with northern charm and southern efficiency. let's assume we go through the fiscal cliff. immigration, corporate tax reform, and investments. emigration, you're not doing the dramatic. vietor due to comprehensive immigration but we did not have a chance to do it. both wings cayman decided it would sabotage it. maybe republicans learned the lesson but i am not sure how much of a lesson. the way that was financed was through the corporate tax increase but there -- that had people on both sides will in to work with the white house and congress. when you talk about infrastructure spending and investments in things we have done with nih, all the talk now is about death. >-- how do you do what the ambitious and admirable the agenda envisions? >> will have the discussion of the debt ceiling again in january. we're not getting away from the somewhat of a doomsday scenario for quite some time. which would allow us to get to glen's position. it is important because the priorities that you outli
on the poor. there's an article in today's -- in "the washington post" on december 19, job boehner's plan b would raise taxes on the poor. really? i mean, is that how you're going to balance the budget? by sticking it to people who already are in vulnerable times? this is wrong. my friends talk about the debt, the deficit, but what they don't talk about is that we have fought two wars, in iraq and afghanistan, and we haven't paid for it. all on our credit card. we send our young men and women into harm's way and we ask them and their families to sacrifice and we do nothing. we just put the bill on our credit card. a few months ago the chairman of the budget committee, mr. ryan, says about $1.3 trillion, i think he's low-balling it, but $1.3 trillion on our debt and nobody over there says a word. they all go after programs like social security and medicare and food stamps. so, mr. speaker, i ask that we defeat the previous question and if we defeat the previous question i will offer an amendment to this rule to make in order an amendment which will allow the house to have a chance to vote on
signs the fiscal cliff talks are on the brink of collapse. chief washington correspondent john harwood joins us from washington with the details. i look away for two seconds, john, and everything's falling astart. >> it looked a couple of days ago as if the two sides were getting closer. when president obama had a news conference at the white house today, he came out to talk about gun control measures in the wake of the connecticut tragedy, but the questions were mostly focused on the fiscal cliff. the president said he couldn't understand why john boehner was detouring to plan b because the differences are narrow enough that they can still work it out. >> i've said i'm willing to make some cuts. what separates suss probably a few hundred billion dollars. the idea that we would put our economy at risk because you can't bridge that gap doesn't make a lot of sense. >> the smackdown from john boehner came shortly afterwards. it was short and sweet. he spoke for less than a minute and he said the onus is going to be on president obama if we go over the fiscal cliff. >> tomorrow the house w
in the white house. tonight, on c-span. >> columnist george will spoke recently at washington university in saint louis about the role of religion and politics. it was hosted by the center on religion and politics will hear from former senator john danfor th, just before mr. we will speaks. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special
'm a small business owner from washington state, and this campaign does not have our best interests at heart. we need to fix the economy before the debt, you know, because i need customers. i don't need corporate -- [inaudible] trying to steal my medicare money. >> all right. i look forward to visiting afterwards for all of our ohio constituents who are here. where was i? so, thank you. but i do appreciate the opportunity to talk for a moment about tax reform -- >> senator portman, i'd like to make it clear that senior citizens are not -- [inaudible] we cannot -- [inaudible] >> um, as you can see, there's a lot of strong opinions on how we deal with our record deficits and debts, but i think everybody here and certainly the folks i talk to back home agree we have to. and these decisions won't be easy. as maya said, the political process is such that it's controversial, and we're going to hear plenty of opinions, it sounds like, from our panelists just as we have from the audience. >> i want to know what you're going to do to make sure the middle class -- >> let him speak! >> boo! >> middle c
? is there a singular documentary film, television show, which stands out to you? >> "mr. smith goes to washington." no matter what your politics are, i cannot imagine anyone watching that film not being somehow moved to have a voice. to be able to put a voice to experience and your point of view. i suppose that gets me every time. >> good choice. >> mine was "it's a wonderful life." it was a snapshot of an imagined america. to the extent that was a window to the rest of the world, people at their best. >> my reaction was "saturday night live." i love politics, i love the sport of politics. i like satire. >> i am going to cheat and say "12 angry men." >> all of holland came to a stop at 7:00 on monday night. thank you very much. >> cinematic columnist george will talks about the relationship between religion and politics. then it james taylor -- james taylor in his recent appearance at the national press club. later, the life of senator robert byrd. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i came down edl was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i went to work for john lindsay, but i would not work f
joining us from the capitol with the very latest is todd zwillich. he's washington correspondent for "the takeaway" on public radio international and a regular guest on the newshour. so todd, you're back with us again. six hours to go until midnight. progress reported but still to deal. >> senate republicans, judy, the latest thing that has happened is senate republicans came out of a conference meeting with their leader, with mitch mcconnell all sounding positive. they all echoed what you had in the piece there from mcconnell saying they were very, very close to sequester the automatic spending cuts remain an outstanding issue. and kind of got thrown into the mix again today. you know, the president in that appearance in the executive office building today in front of a supportive crowd, not really a press conference, more of like a minirally, talked about the sequester and his desire to have any delay in the sequester paid for with revenue increases. you know, i talked to a few house members just a few moments ago. not only ot tone of the president's presentation, but also that demand w
in washington, thanks to you to the bank of america. thanks to you, john, and thanks to your colleagues. so you may have gotten cards. we're be bringing you into the conversation. so be thinking about what you're going to ask. so without further ado, we'll bring in bob woodward. mr. woodward. [applause] >> which is your chair? >> you get the daddy chair. >> thank you. >> so the price of politics, which has become a bestseller, as all your books do, looked at the last cliff, negotiations over the previous grand bargain that didn't quite get over the finish line. what does that teach us about the current cliff negotiations? >> well, it's groundhog day. the question is who's playing bill murray. and i mean, such a repetition. it's the same players at the same seats at the table with the same doctrines. so where this goes, i think anyone who thinks they know is wrong. some people say it's a fiscal cliff. some people say it's a slope. some say it's a bungee jump. some say it's a skateboard trip. it's going to go down and up and so forth. bottom line, i think, it's no way to govern. it is a giant mis
, which stands out to you? >> "mr. smith goes to washington." no matter what your politics are, i cannot imagine anyone watching that film not being somehow moved to have a voice. to be able to put a voice to experience and your point of view. i suppose that gets me every time. >> good choice. >> mine was "it's a wonderful life." it was a snapshot of an imagined america. but maybe in america that was also at its best. to the extent that was a window to the rest of the world, people at their best. >> david? >> my reaction was "saturday night live." [laughter] i love politics, i love the sport of politics. i find it fascinating. between saturday night live in jon stewart, -- and jon stewart,i like satire. >> i am going to cheat and say "12 angry men." >> all of holland came to a stop at 7:00 on monday night. peyton place. >> really? >> thank you very much. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> coming up on c-span -- talks about the judicial system with supreme court justices stephen briar and anthony kennedy. and
. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors and please chiefs. we have never, to my knowledge, had anybody who has ever created, let alone starred in movies or tv series until tonight. and we have michael lynn on the to thank for that. mike sl co-
and the antiscientist left and as he said my name is alex and i got my ph.d. in microbiology from washington, and more importantly now the editor of nuclear science.com. so, just a little bit about my background entirely microbiology. in fact that's me. a friend of mine had become an ob/gyn so i look like a geek in that picture so i put there. that's me working in the chamber which you may have come across at one point. uigur left with extremely slowly bacteria. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and i got my ph.d. in 2010 and then i immediately became an editor of science and i was in the real world for two years. so, my personal science philosophy is rather straightforward and simple. if you're not an expert it is best to accept the mainstream science. it should always come before politics. and that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. so, in view of a plea for teen science i don't country talk playing for the team right or blue but for science and i think we should always try to purge antiscientific thinking even if it comes from our friends and political allies
been like. follow clifton truman daniel sunday on c-span 3. 9:00 p.m. eastern. "washington journal" continues. att: this week we're looking the united states long-term energy outlook. we will use a new report that came out this week from the u.s. energy information administration that protect u.s. energy consumption out to the year 2014. adam sieminski is the administrator of the eia. missionwhat the eia's is. guest: it is one of the 14 of the independent statistical agencies here in washington. we are responsible for energy information. we are by law -- it is supposed to be unbiased and neutral in our development of energy analysis, using the debt that we collect -- data that we collect. the annual energy outlook reference case, which were published today, is not really a forecast as it is a baseline. it is built on the idea of existing law and regulation so that the public and policymakers can compare what new laws and regulations or changes in world events might mean to our baseline. host: frank verrastro doggett is vice president of the energy program at the nonprofit center fo
's is good. david: but not that good. lauren: number one thing is watch next week is washington, d.c. as we move closer and closer to the fiscal cliff everyone will be keeping an eye out on a big deal or could we see a big tax hike. only three weeks before we possibly go over. david: wonder if we trade the guns to avoid a deal for the fiscal cliff. lauren: you're onto something. david: maybe. i don't think they would go for that. "money" with melissa francis is coming next. melissa: i'm melissa francis. here is what is money tonight. a huge break through for u.s. natural gas. a key government study could open the door for exports and create a boom for the economy. the only thing standing in the way though is president obama. we'll drill down with a natural gas company's ceo. >>> plus fighting crazy with crazy. could two plat nurm coins worth a trillion dollars each solve our debt crisis? is it as nuts as it sounds? bear with me here, people. our "money" power panel will break it down. >>> are plastic bags on the way to extinction. they're completely banned in two cities. chicago wants to ni
in the united states to our maximum benefit? at a time when washington is talking about our fiscal crisis i'd say that the relationship of our oil needs to this crisis itself are close. it might not solve our fiscal crisis but clearly it's a necessary ingredient. every recession in the history of the united states in moden times has been preceded by or happening concurrent with an oil price spike. if we don't have continued growth we can cut all we want and raise revenue all we want, but we'll never find a way to solve our fiscal troubles. and i think this report really looks at how do we leverage this great abundance, this great blessing in the united states, both of our resources and of our innovative skills to help the country through these times and put us in a good footing for the next 50, 100 years. and secondly, i think this report really is the beginning of a process of creating an effective deep and stable bipartisan consensus on energy policy, in a town where everything is about the zero sum game. we are trying to escape that zero sum game. and we see the oil security as a unifyin
in my apartment here in washington, d.c., proudly i do. i would encourage support of this and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. waxman: mr. speaker, we have no further requests for speakers on our side of the aisle to support this legislation. i know almost all democrats that i've talked to think it's a good bill. i've urged the others to join with them in supporting it. i think it's a worthwhile piece of legislation. it's a small step but it's a step in the right direction and it will clarify some issues that still need to be clarified. so let's get this done and in pursuit of that objective, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. whitfield: i also want to urge everybody to support h.r. 6582, the small, modest energy efficiency bill, that will save some jobs. certainly want to thank the members of the senate,
in politics who don't like the republicans who do not like the democrats, who do not like washington, you know what they do like? they like barack obama because they sense something about him that he's not a part of it. so even that first debate there we thought was a debacle, a lot of us people thought "well, i liked that because he's not playing th game, he's not playing gotcha, he's not saying nasty things." that that helped the balance for him. >> rose: i'll tell you who didn't like it, his campaign staff. >> i asked, -- at the end of the interview i said to him i ran into somebody during the course of the campaign who useded to work for you who is now the mayor of a major american city. >> rose: could it be chicago? (laughs) >> and i said to him "what happened, rahm, in that first debate?" and rahm looked at me and said "he haa hawaii moment." and when i said that the president laughed very loudly and he caught himself back and he told this lovely story there meant meant that when things seemed to be going to hell in a hand basket he and rahm would sit in the oval office and think "what w
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)